corporate slavery, money bag over head

The Corporate Slavery Plantation

Corporations Linked to Slavery

Do you dread work? Are you getting ahead in your job, achieving personal potential and destiny? Or are you just paying the rent? Welcome to the American dream! Many people live under the daily burden of American corporate slavery.

The American corporation achieved the status of a “person” under the law in the 1886 in a Supreme Court case, Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific. This is only a few years after the close of the Civil War and the supposed end of slavery in the United States. This is no coincidence. A sinister transaction took place; the plantation slave owner was supplanted by a far more insidious slave master, the corporate “person.”

The corporate “person” has tremendous power. Hundreds of individual corporations have bigger economies than individual countries! Yet this “person” is truly a monster, a monster that lacks morals, a monster that lacks a soul. The corporate monster has an insatiable appetite for profits, ever more profits. The corporation is a Godzilla who eats human souls for money. This is truly the Beast spoken of in the book of Revelation.

The CEOs and leaders of the corporate monster may have good in their hearts, but they have no control. They grip tight to their elite positions while creating an unscalable ladder to their heaven through thousands of computers, conflicting rules, work schedules, and low-rung corporate slaves.  Beholden to its appetite, to the great wealth for those at the top, the corporate “person” has a life of its own beyond any human control.

The Education of Corporate Slavery

The slaves on the corporate plantation do not rebel. They are trained well, from the first day the slave child enters kindergarten. The slave child is expected to sit down and do his or her work. The slave child who listens to the teacher authority is rewarded. The slave child who does not conform has his or her name written on the board, embarrassed into cooperation.

Some children never conform, but as juveniles they usually end up in the principal’s office, detention, jail. It is all about the domestication of the zoo animals, each with its own cage. And these cages have grown ever smaller with the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Race to the Top grants. With this legislation, even the arts are slipping away from these slaves, turning them into brute beasts of labor.

People who create art are people who think. Thinking is dangerous for the Beast. Artists starve in the corporate slavery system.

The corporate slave master hides itself well. It lauds its achievement of bringing “prosperity” to the world, while downplaying all of its victims who line up for jobs in the streets of despair, asking only for a hot meal and their next month’s rent.

The American Church and Corporate Slavery

The American Evangelical church lines up behind the corporate Beast. The church roars the battle cry of prosperity, the church provides soldiers for the war, the church supports the system of the rich ruling the poor, the church calls “lazy” those on the bottom rungs of the corporate slavery system. Meanwhile, Jesus weeps as the entire bounty of the earth is stolen from him by the corporate masters.

The pastors line up, begging to be a part of this elite. They hold meetings about the corporate structure of their churches, and how many “giving units” tithed this week. They go home to their nice middle-class or better lifestyles, while telling the poor working people to put their last penny into the offering plate and trust God for the rent.

The American pastors ignore all the pain of the corporate slaves who barely scrape by right outside their church doors. They hate Jesus and his cry for social justice, for feeding the poor and setting the captives free. They love the rewards of the Revelation beast corporate system. They will truly go down to the pit with their lover.

 

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